Topiary Frames

Using Frames To Create Garden Topiary

With the arrival of topiary frames onto the market even the most ornate of topiary is achievable by just about anyone.  Topiary frames come in all shapes and sizes to match any taste, ranging from simple geometric shapes to animals of all descriptions.

DIFFERENT STYLES OF FRAMES

wild-animal
Wild Animals
dog
Pets
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Birds
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Geometric Shapes
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Farm Animals
butterfly
Insects

What topiary frames provide is a guide for clipping and training your plants. This has greatly simplified the process and has allowed the average gardener the confidence to have a go and enjoy the look of topiary within their garden.

Below is an explanation of three common methods of creating topiary with a topiary frame as well as links to different shops where you can source what you need.

Using Topiary frames Over Plants

The first method is taking your frame and placing it over a suitable plant. The type of plant to use is dependant upon how big your topiary frame is and how fast you want your topiary to grow. There is a trade off though with using a faster growing plant, be aware that it will require more clipping than a slower growing variety.

A list of suitable plants include:

– Buxus (box hedge)
This is the mainstay for a lot of topiary as it clips very well and is very hardy. Buxus will grow to a height around 3 foot though there is also a dwarf version available called Buxus sempervirens “Suffruticosa” which grows to about half the height. This variety is perfect for smaller frames and grows at a slow to medium pace.

– Lonicera (box leaf honeysuckle)
Lonicera is another excellent plant for topiary as it has small leaves and clips well. This plant grows to around 6 foot if left unclipped so is good for larger framed topiaries. Growth is fast.

-Rosemary
The process is very simple, all you have to do is open the frame and place it over the top of your plant and wait until the plant grows through, then clip to shape. Here is a video explaining the process in a bit more detail.

Using Topiary Frames Filled with Moss

Another method of using topiary frames is to fill the frame full of sphagnum moss (available at garden centers and home depots) then plant suitable groundcovers into the moss. Suitable ground covers include:

– Bacopa
– Thyme
– Corsican mint
– Dichondra repens
– Babys tears
– Irish moss

The real advantage about using the groundcovers is that you get a good result very quickly as the groundcover rapidly forms a carpet, covering the frame to give the impression of a more traditional topiary without the years of training. Below are a couple of videos demonstrating how to create a topiary from ground covers.

Using Topiary Frames with Climbing Vines

Another method of using topiary frames is to fill the frame full of sphagnum moss (available at garden centers and home depots) then plant suitable groundcovers into the moss. Suitable ground covers include:

– Bacopa
– Thyme
– Corsican mint
– Dichondra repens
– Babys tears
– Irish moss

The real advantage about using the groundcovers is that you get a good result very quickly as the groundcover rapidly forms a carpet, covering the frame to give the impression of a more traditional topiary without the years of training. Below are a couple of videos demonstrating how to create a topiary from ground covers.

With the arrival of topiary frames onto the market even the most ornate of topiary is achievable by just about anyone.
Topiary frames come in all shapes and sizes to match any taste, ranging from simple geometric shapes to animals of all descriptions.

DIFFERENT STYLES OF FRAMES

The last method is using climbing plants such as ivy to create a topiary. This method definitely suits the impatient gardener as within months a finished look can be achieved.

Using climbers or vines for topiary works best with simpler geometric shapes such as:

– Pyramids
– Spheres or globes
– Spirals
– Hearts
– Wreaths

This method of topiary tends to create a more rustic look when compared to the more traditional look of topiary, but I think it still looks effective and if that style suits you why not give it a go.